Synthetic Cubism is an early 20th century art movement that is considered to be a precursor to the more well-known Cubism movement. Synthetic Cubism is characterized by the use of geometric shapes to create a more simplified and abstracted representation of objects and scenes. The term “synthetic” in this context refers to the way in which the artists synthesized different styles and influences to create their own unique movement.

The origins of Synthetic Cubism date back to 1910, when Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque began working together in Paris. They were both interested in exploring new ways of representing objects and scenes, and eventually developed the Cubist style of painting. Unlike the more naturalistic style of painting that was popular at the time, Cubist paintings featured simplified geometric shapes that were intended to give a more abstracted and stylized representation of objects.

The Cubist style proved to be very influential, and over the next few years it was adopted by various other artists. However, the Cubist movement eventually died out in the early 1920s, as artists began to explore other styles such as Dada and Surrealism.

Despite its short-lived popularity, the Cubist style has been credited with paving the way for later art movements such as Surrealism and Abstract Expressionism. It also helped to establish the idea of the modern artist as someone who is not bound by traditional styles and conventions, and is free to explore new and innovative ways of expression.

How is Synthetic Cubism different from traditional Cubism?

Synthetic Cubism is a type of Cubism that was developed in 1912 by the artists Jean Metzinger and Albert Gleizes. It is different from traditional Cubism in a few ways.

First, Synthetic Cubism is based more on geometric shapes than traditional Cubism. The artists focused more on creating abstract shapes and patterns than on realistically depicting objects.

Second, Synthetic Cubism is more abstract and less realistic than traditional Cubism. The artists eliminated most of the texture and depth from their paintings, and replaced them with simple geometric shapes and colors.

Third, Synthetic Cubism is more organized and systematic than traditional Cubism. The artists arranged their shapes in a more orderly and geometric fashion, and used a more limited color palette.

Overall, Synthetic Cubism is a more simplified and abstract version of traditional Cubism. It is less realistic, and focused more on geometric shapes and patterns.

analytic cubism

What is analytic cubism?

Analytic cubism is an early 20th century avant-garde art movement that ushered in a new era of abstract art. The movement was spearheaded by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, who pioneered the use of geometric shapes and lines to create representational images. Analytic cubism is characterized by its simplified shapes, precise lines, and flattened perspective. Picasso and Braque developed analytic […]

cubism

When did cubism start

Cubism is an early-20th-century avant-garde art movement that revolutionized European painting and sculpture, and inspired related movements in music and literature. Cubism has been described as the most influential art movement of the 20th century. The term cubism is derived from the French word “cube”. The movement was founded in 1907 by Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, who developed the […]

The pioneers of Synthetic Cubism

Synthetic Cubism was an early 20th century avant-garde art movement that emerged in Paris, France. The pioneers of the movement were Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque, who developed the style in response to the emergence of Cubism. Synthetic Cubism is characterized by the use of geometric shapes and flat surfaces, and the absence of shading and modeling. The artists aimed to create a more simplified and abstract form of Cubism, which was in contrast to the more representational style of the original Cubist movement.

Some of the most famous Synthetic Cubist works

Cubism is an early-20th-century art movement that revolutionized European painting and sculpture, and inspired related movements in music and architecture. Cubism has been called the most influential art movement of the 20th century.

The term “Cubism” was first used by French artist Georges Braque in 1907. He and his colleague Pablo Picasso were the first to apply the principles of the movement to sculpture. Cubism is characterized by an emphasis on the geometrical arrangement of forms, and the fragmentation of objects into simple shapes that can be seen from multiple viewpoints.

Some of the most famous Cubist paintings are Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, Braque’s The Guitar, and Juan Gris’ The Glass of Absinthe.

synthetic cubism

The decline of Synthetic Cubism

The decline of synthetic cubism began in the early 1920s when several artists began to break away from the style. This was largely due to the criticism that synthetic cubism had received from the public and the art community.

Some of the earliest signs of the decline were seen in the work of Jean Metzinger and Albert Gleizes. They began to experiment with new styles, such as Orphism and Purism.

In addition, other artists began to distance themselves from synthetic cubism. These included Francis Picabia, Marcel Duchamp, and Man Ray.

By the late 1920s, synthetic cubism was largely abandoned by the art community.

The resurgence of Synthetic Cubism

The resurgence of Synthetic Cubism is a direct result of the increasing popularity of geometric abstract art. The term Synthetic Cubism was first used by the French art critic Louis Vauxcelles to describe the work of Fernand L├ęger and Jean Metzinger. Synthetic Cubism is a style of painting that uses geometric shapes to create an abstract image.

The resurgence of Synthetic Cubism began in the early 2000s, with the work of artists such as Alex Grey, David Hockney, and Patrick Hughes. These artists used the style of Synthetic Cubism to create paintings that were influenced by the digital age. Their paintings often featured bright colors and bold geometric shapes.

In recent years, the resurgence of Synthetic Cubism has become even more popular, with artists such as Yoko Ono, Alex Katz, and Julian Schnabel using the style to create paintings that are influenced by popular culture and current events.